Thursday, July 13, 2017

Pick Up A Pulp [20]: DON'T CRY FOR ME by William Campbell Gault

Originally published in 1952 and later by Prologue Books in 2012 (I'm sure there's a bunch of editions in between) Don't Cry for Me by William Campbell Gault is a murder mystery that doesn't really feel like a murder mystery. 

The story focuses on Pete Worden, a former high school (or maybe college - it's not overly clear which) football star who spends his time doing a whole lot of nothing. Being a bum for a living makes being respectable a challenge, and there's only so long you can bask in the glory days of semi-pro football. It's only when Ellen, Pete's steady girlfriend, starts probing him about his plans for the future, specially plans for getting a job, that Pete peaks out from the curtain of long time unemployment and childish apprehension and squints at the real world laid bare before him. What does Pete see? An underworld heavy with an eye for 'talent' and a desire to bring Pete and the lovely Ellen under his wing.

A chance encounter with a rough type at one of Nicks parties results in Pete slugging the guy and making out with a pocket full of gambled-earned cash. Suddenly his long term prospects look on the up, until the rough guy ends up in Pete's apartment with a knife in his neck.     

Don't Cry for Me didn't start well, got better in the middle and then drifted into delirium in the later stages before finishing up ok. That's really all there is to this book - it's not bad, nor is it particularly good - it's an ok, average pulp that has a couple of nice scenes and well written characters marred by a plot that felt like is lost its way a little at times. 

There are better pulps out there but if you've got this one sitting around it's worth a read.

My rating: 2.5/5 stars 

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Review: PURGATORY by Ken Bruen

Publisher Transworld Books
Length 348 pages
Format paperback
Published 2013
Series Jack Taylor #10
My Copy I bought it


My Review
I usually read the Jack Taylor books as soon as they are published but for some reason Purgatory slipped through. Now I'm finally getting around to it as part of rereading the series and it was well worth the wait.

Purgatory feels like a tipping point in the Jack Taylor series, one which looks set to transition the tainted yet endearing protagonist from one phase of his life to another darker phase - which is saying something given Jack sure hasn't had it easy to this point.

The focus is on a mysterious vigilante working under the name C33 who tries court Jack and Stewart into joining their murderous past time to rid criminals and underworld types from the street.

Then there's Jack's interesting love/hate working relationship with a sly billionaire named Reardon who hires Jack to find out who's leaking trade secrets to his competitors. Jack not only gets handed a bundle of cash for his troubles but is also introduced to a femme fatale in Kelly, a take-charge character who has Jack falling for her in jig time; she's Reardon's assistant and plays a large part in Purgatory; one of the freshest new characters to enter the series in a while. 

Purgatory has a number of jaw dropping scenes adding fuel to a series full of jaw dropping moments. Long time readers of Jack Taylor won't forget this book in a long time.

My rating: 5/5 stars.

Monday, July 10, 2017

Pick of the Month [June 2017]

A little late but here's my pick of month for June 2017 blog post - and what an awesome reading month it was! I read 17 books (my most since January, in which I also read 17 books) but it's not all about getting notches under my belt, I'd rather read quality over quantity any day, luckily I read (or listened to) a heap of good books making this month the toughest month to pick. 

It was very hard to separate a number of books so I'm rolling with both Ready Player One by Ernest Cline, which I listened to, and Ten Dead Comedians by Fred Van Lente. Both of these books got me at just the right time and I enjoyed the hell out of them. 

I read Ten Dead Comedians after finishing a disturbing (and very well written) true crime The Spider and the Fly by Claudia Rowe and was in need of something more lighthearted and fun. Fred Van Lente did a great job with this book and I highly recommend it for readers who are in need of something a little different and less macabre in their crime fiction (don't worry, there's still a decent amount of murder and mystery going on here). You can read my review HERE on Goodreads.


I was late to party in reading (listening to) Ready Player One but had heard so many good things about it, thankfully the book lived up to, and then surpassed my expectations. A great read that will no doubt end up in my 'top 10 list' at years' end. You can read the review HERE.

Other books I rated 5 stars in June in no particular order:

A couple of rereads also featured
  • Headstone by Ken Bruen - the 9th book in the Jack Taylor series, gets better with each read
  • Welcome to the Bayou by Victor Gischler (graphic novel) - I love what Gischler does here when given the keys to the Punisher castle. 

Saturday, July 8, 2017

Book Review: OCTOBER IS THE COLDEST MONTH by Christoffer Carlsson

Publisher Scribe
Length 192 pages
Format paperback
Published 2017
Series standalone
My Copy provided by the publisher


My Review
I've got a feeling this book could be one of the sleeper hits of the year, particularly for those readers who enjoy dark rural settings and tainted yet endearing characters. 

October is the Coldest Month has a rural noir feel akin to Daniel Woodrell; it's not quite Winter's Bone or Tomato Red in terms of plotting but it is deep in character and atmosphere.

The focus is on 16 year old Vega, a school kid street smart in a country way who unwillingly becomes an accessory to murder. When the police come knocking on her mother's door in search of Vega's older brother Jakob, she knows her secret is out and it's only a matter of time before her family is torn apart for a second time; the first being the death of her father. 

October is the Coldest Month is a quick read that will resonate with the reader long after the last page is turned. Vega is a character I just want to read more of, along with backstory snippets of past conflict over land and the illegal making of moonshine, these's a whole lot more to this book that begs for a second volume. 

My rating: 5/5 stars 

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Review: READY PLAYER ONE by Ernest Cline

Publisher Random House Audiobooks
Length 15hrs 40mins
Format audiobook
Published 2012
Series standalone
My Copy I bought it


My Review
Ready Player One envelopes the reader in a warm and comfy haze of 1980’s nostalgia, complete with pop culture references through a detailed exploration of early generation home gaming consoles, TV shows, movies and fashion. 

Set some 60 years after the 80’s, Ready Player One focuses on a lonesome young man named Wade Watts - an avid gamer who lives inside the Oasis (a massive multi-player online game) more than he does the real world, as he embarks on a hunt for an elusive egg hidden by the games developer before he died. 

This isn't some simple side-mission to kill time, finding the egg will bring fame and fortune to the lucky treasure hunter - in both the real world as well as online. Hindering Wade's chances of being the first to discover the egg is an evil corporation of cookie-cutter gamers known as the Sixers; a conglomerate of generic gamers with no personality or unique avatar - they are the public minions of corporate evil. 

Ready Player One is a nerd boy (or girls) dream. Even readers who don't 'get' all the nerdy references will still get a sense of time and place, and how these 80's relics play a huge part in the overall story and Wade's race to be top of the leader-board. 

I loved everything about it - the plotting, characters, pacing, narration - all of it. 


My rating: 5/5 stars 

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Midyear Best of Crime Fiction [Published 2017]


2017 has already provided some memorable crime fiction reads. This year, more than others, I've been reading a lot of the newer books (this despite my TBR continuing to overflow) which feels refreshing; I can talk about the hot new book just on or about to be on the shelves with fellow readers rather than playing catch-up (though there's a fair amount of this going on still - such is the life of an avid reader). In no particular order below is my list of the best of a very good bunch with some honorable mentions thrown in:

Little Deaths by Emma Flint (published January) - review HERE

The Girl Who Was Taken by Charlie Donlea (published April) - review HERE

Lola by Melissa Scrivner Love (published March) - review HERE

Crimson Lake by Candice Fox (published January) - review HERE

Marlborough Man by Alan Carter (published June) - review HERE

The Secrets She Keeps by Michael Robotham (to be published in July)  - review HERE

Honorable mentions:



Desperation Road by Michael Farris Smith (published Feb) - review HERE

The Girl in Kellers Way by Megan Goldin (published May) - review HERE

Something For Nothing by Andy Muir (published Feb) - review HERE